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. >> next a look at the fbi and its role in investigating cyber related crimes. from this morning's "washington journal" this is about 45 minutes. >> this week's segment involving your money will look at the fbi's role in fighting cyber crimes. and we are talking about-based terrorism, espionage. computer intrusions, major cyber fraud. will learn a little bit, then we will get to your calls and will learn a little bit first from shawn henry, who was the fbi's executive director for criminal and cyber programs. and been in a peer for quite a number of years by thank you for joining us. >> thanks are having. spent first of all what exactly is a cybercrime? >> when you talk about cyber, i think danger to any type of criminal activity that involves the use of the computer i think that's what most people talk about. when i talk about cybercrime on focusing on intrusions into computer networks. so those networks that we all use every single day come to increase efficiency and effectiveness in and our productivity. but those very same things that make those networks were effective for us
.s. army, the u.s. navy, the state department and fbi cut treasury, commerce and every major agency in the u.s. government had its own intelligence service specialized nature. so it was created to naturalize or centralize that intelligence existence which is something that the model offered the british which is also very controversy all major -- major because there are blamed by inference in the british system. so it was a very interesting experience because in world war ii was the prior opportunity for the proponent of a centralized intelligence to prove its worth? ?d that's likely it was???? fascinating and generated a lot of argument for the purpose of providing the legal??????? justification.????????? it became a very important??? ground because all that exist in military generals or admirals' did not like having the overarching intelligence service working under them because they are the local boss. and only in china the command structure was a mess. there was no unity of command, and the creator, the director of the oss opportunity so they invested very
to the pentagon and ig on the one hand and to the fbi with regards to general petraeus. >> but he's not, i mean big picture watching this, shaking his head saying, guys, we need a more sense of leadership here? >> he's not going to make a grand pronouncement or decisions about things based on, you know, two situations, two individual cases. he's focused on the missions that the military's tasked with carrying out and the cia and the general intelligence community tasked with carrying out, and with acting overall agenda which encompasses not just national security policy, but obviously domestic policy. >> thank you. >> yes. >> jay, has the president spoke to general allen directly? >> not that i'm aware of, no. >> spoke with secretary panetta? >> i have to check that. secretary panetta has been traveling. >> as a follow-up question, does the president see this in general as an unwelcomed distraction at a time when she's just -- was re-elected, and he has a bunch of priorities in terms of the fiscal cliff and in terms of the cabinet? >> well, i certainly, i think wouldn't call it welcome, but obv
in the contractors who carried in quality. the fbi had a skull the interrogators from the high value detainee's that came from higher levels special allegiance but for the most part this was caught flatfooted and they were prepared to do large-scale. we have slowly tried to improve that. to the obama's administration credit he said the high value detainee interrogation group which is an agency group which sends out interrogators' every time a high value is teaching and there is a research unit that stood out to study best practices and spend them out into the training academies thus training practices about interrogation and that's been up and running for a few years and has already -- i know improved training techniques to respect michael skerker is a professor of the u.s. naval academy and the author of this book's an ethics of interrogation. here it is. this is book tv at the u.s. naval academy. >>> professor maochun yu talked with the strategic services in china and the failure and success. this interview which was of the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland is a part of booktv colleg
are strong. you can identify that pattern and when and former partners. dhs, fbi, cia, the white house, we sit on these policy boards so that we can all collectively address the problem that will take us into the next century. our best defense is going to be understanding the offense. as an intelligence organization, we spend a lot of time in the offensive mud. we collect human intelligence. as they consider ways to address the threats in the 21st century, left to also understand they're not all technology base. you all of legislation that drives what you do every day. i would anticipate this year, senator collins introduced a cyber security bill. it was geared towards a single owner of all things cyber. it is kind of hard when you have millions of people working for the government. in the end, you'll see cyber legislation that addresses standards of operating -- operating standards of performance, standards of protection, and how each agency does it will be very different. so much like a common definition lexicon, there will be standards. laws that can define acceptable behavior in cybers
outside the justice department. outside the fbi, the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that then was not a threat to national security. had we made the determination that a threat to national security existed, we would, of course, have made that known to the president and also to the appropriate members on the hill. as we went through the investigation, looked at the facts, and tried to exam them as they develop. we were very -- we felt very secure in the knowledge that a national security threat did not exist that warranted the sharing of that information with the white house or with the -- when we got a point in the investigation, it was very late in the investigation after a critical interview occurred on the friday before we made that disclosure. when we got to that point, when we thought it was appropriate to share the information, we did so. >> thank you. >>> friday on washington journal, republican wisconsin senator ron johnson on the fiscal cliff negotiation and what's ahead for the congress. more on the fisc
on the specifics of the investigation. the fbi has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. and i'm going to let director mueller and others examine those protocols, and make some statements to the public generally. i do want to emphasize what i said before. general petraeus had an extraordinary career. deserved this country with great distinction in iraq, in afghanistan, and as head of the cia. by his own assessment, he did not meet the standards that he felt were necessary as the director of cia with respect to this personal matter that he is now dealing with, with his family, and with his wife. and it's on that basis that he tendered his resignation, and it's on that basis that i accepted it. but i want to emphasize that from my perspective at least, he has provided this country and extraordinary service. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this instead of being -- this into a being a single side note on what has been otherwise been an extraordinary career. [inaudible] >> you kn
was founded in coastal town in was on the fbi's most wanted list and responsible for the murders in boston. there is no evidence to suggest that and it's hard to prove that we have the compound that has been translated if there was a smoking gun. if it was a smoking gun proving the relations are not so good that we wouldn't have pointed out. is it the difference it and the diplomats and journalists similar than they know. there is no evidence that i have seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being. this led to the problem this was for the pakistani military and intelligence and a different question that we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they do that he was there at that time. >> in 2003 on the two locations al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and that pakistan the state has been quite helpful and the operational commander of 9/11. they are held on al qaeda when it comes to the taliban as a separate story. i won't let you off the hook. the new america foundation if you're interested in drones to keep track of the drone strike
or the fbi undercover and lo and behold that was just a front so that they could defend themselves when actually they were committing fraud and criminal activity. lastly i would conclude mr. griffin and dr. burgess indicated certainly if you have the ability to go in and prosecute and take the computers from necc then surely you have the jurisdiction to shut them down because you have the jurisdiction to go in and take their equipment and certainly i think many of us on this committee are disappointed that you are not providing the e-mails and the information we need so we can get to the bottom of this and that was the intention of this whole hearing is to see what really happened. with that, the subcommittee is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] by military trainers at the lakeland air force base in texas. this 40 minute briefing in chases 45 policy changes being enacted at lakeland which is the home of all air force basic training. >> good afternoon and thank you for making time to be with us here today. i'm joined by major general woodard who is assigned to air force safety here at
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
agencies who carry firearms in the government. i don't mind the police or the fbi, well, the department of agricultural has a swat team. the fish and wildlife have a swat team. they raided gibson guitar with guns drawn, took their computer equipment. when they accused them of something which was breaking a foreign regulation. a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in the india. those are the kind of stories we write about. >> how come we haven't heard about that before? >> some of them you have heard. one the case of john and judy. they were selling bun anies in missouri. they fined $95,000 for having a wrong permit. the government said you can pay on the website. if you don't pay in thirty days you'll owe $3.1 billion. it's the kind of stuff the government is doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confiscating people's land and saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland. even though there isn't a pond or stream on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >>
to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to the american people what was going on in the bailouts. to help guide treasury who is in charge of implementing the program to make sure the policy goals would be implemented. as mike is telling me about this, i had no idea why he was telling me until he said he was going to recommend me to the white house for this job. i was not interested in going to washington, i really had no interest in going back, and i started picking through the reasons to mike, getting rare my -- married in january, just started the mortgage fraud group, a big trial working years on to try coming up, and mike knocked my objections d
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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